Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Sailing before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

For the majority of modern history, Sailing has been used as a mode of transportation across bodies of water. From the first sailboats in Ancient Egypt to the early 20th Century, Sailing was essential to cross the world’s oceans to reach faraway countries/continents. However, with modern technological advancements, Sailing has been increasingly used for recreational and sporting purposes.

Sailing is both simple and complex. While there are many intricacies to racing rules, the simplest explanation is that Sailing is a race between either two (known as a match race) or multiple (known as a fleet race) sailboats. The first person/team to cover the required distance is the winner. There are many different types of sailboats used throughout the sports history. Currently, the eligible boat types are Dinghy, Skiff, Multihull, Sailboard, Kiteboard and Monotype.

Great Britain is the most successful nation at the Olympics, with 31 gold, 21 silver and 12 bronze medals in sailing. In 2020, Great Britain won three gold medals. Giles Scott won the Men’s Finn, Stuart Bithell and Dylan Fletcher won the Men’s 49er and Eilidh McIntyre and Hannah Mills won the Women’s 470. McIntyre’s father, Michael McIntyre who won sailing gold at the 1988 Seoul Games, was a graduate of the University of Glasgow.

Scottish Student Sport selects individuals to join their Sailing team every year, where they compete in a host of events including the Laser Performance Collegiate Cup. There is also the SSS Yachting Championship, Team Racing Championship, Ceilidh Cup and BUCS MR Finals. For more information, click here: https://www.scottishstudentsport.com/sports/sailing/

If you’re interested in joining a Sailing club, click the following links:

UHI: https://www.hisa.uhi.ac.uk/groups/uhi-wind-and-wave-club

University of Aberdeen: https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/ausailing/

University of Dundee: https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/sailing/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/sailing/

University of Glasgow: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/sailing/

University of St. Andrews: https://sailing.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Strathclyde: https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/7120/

 

Sports Chair: Hazel Brimelow – scottishstudentsailing@outlook.com

Governing Body: RYA Scotland – https://www.rya.org.uk/gbni/scotland

Follow us at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/501537636669175/user/100058824922149/

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Rugby before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

One of Scotland’s most beloved sports, Rugby may seem complicated at first. The origins of Rugby are somewhat dubious, with one famous tale stating that William Webb Ellis invented the sport when he picked up a football during a school game in the town of Rugby, Warwickshire. While this isn’t confirmed, the unusual tale acts as a catalyst for the somewhat unusual nature of the sport.

Rugby has two popular variations, Rugby League and Rugby Union. As the specific rules of the game are extensive, a basic outline and comparison of the two variations will be outlined here. Players can score points in different ways in rugby matches. These are:

Try – A try is awarded when a team can get the ball into the end of the opposing team’s half (known as the try line). In Rugby Union, this will award the team five points whereas a try will be awarded four points in Rugby League. Scoring a try will also earn the team a conversion, which is a free kick of the ball from the point of the final play pass. A designated kicker will then have to kick the ball between the goalposts to earn the extra two points for a successful conversion.

Drop Ball  – A drop ball is when a ball is kicked between the goal posts during an active passage of play. This will gain three points in Rugby Union but only one in Rugby League.

Penalty – A penalty is awarded when a player is fouled by the opposition. A team may opt for a penalty kick, which must be placed between the goalposts. This will net you three points in Rugby Union and two in Rugby League.

There are many other rule differences between Rugby Union and Rugby League but they share the same common objective. Teams will try to gain points by using a mix of the mentioned methods. The winner is the team with the most points at the end of the game. Games last for 80 minutes in two forty-minute halves. Players are only allowed to throw the ball backwards, with forward play only allowed if the ball is kicked forward. Players are allowed to tackle each other. However, tackles deemed to be dangerous can result in penalties and the award of cards. A yellow card will cause the player to be removed from the pitch for ten minutes and a red will remove them permanently. Teams are not allowed to substitute removed players.

Scotland has been a very successful national Rugby Union team, having won the prestigious Home Nations and Five Nations tournaments 11 times each. Currently, they rank 7th in the world. Notable college/university alumni currently in the national team are Simon Berghan (Edinburgh Napier), James Bhatti (Edinburgh College) and George Horn (University of Edinburgh).

Scottish Student Sport collates a Rugby team to compete together every year, with two or three games available to the team. There are also BUCS Rugby leagues where universities compete against each other. To find out more, click here: https://www.scottishstudentsport.com/sports/rugby/

If you are interested in joining a Rugby club, click these links:

 

Abertay University: https://www.abertay.ac.uk/life/abertay-sport/university-sports-union/rugby/

Edinburgh College: https://twitter.com/ecsportsunion?lang=en

Edinburgh Napier (Men’s): https://www.napierstudents.com/organisation/sports/napierrugbyunion/

Edinburgh Napier (Women’s): https://www.napierstudents.com/organisation/sports/napierrugbyunion/

Glasgow Caledonian University (Men’s): https://www.gcustudents.co.uk/groups/rugby-mens–2

Glasgow Caledonian University (Women’s): https://www.gcustudents.co.uk/groups/rugby-women-s–2

Heriot-Watt University: https://sportsunion.site.hw.ac.uk/rugby/

Queen Margaret University (Men’s): https://www.qmusu.org.uk/groups/rugby-men-s-99ff

Queen Margaret University (Women’s): https://www.qmusu.org.uk/groups/rugby-women-s-c780

RGU: https://www.rguunion.co.uk/getinvolved/societies/rugby/

University of Aberdeen (Men’s): https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/6276/

University of Aberdeen (Women’s): https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/6492/

University of Dundee (Men’s): https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/rugby-men/

University of Dundee (Women’s):  https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/rugby-women/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/mensrugby/

University of Edinburgh (Touch): https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/touch/

University of Glasgow (Men’s): https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/rugbymen/

University of Glasgow (Women’s): https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/rugbywomen/

University of St. Andrews: https://rugby.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Stirling (Men’s): https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/mensrugby/

University of Stirling (Women’s): https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/womensrugby/

University of Strathclyde (Men’s): https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/7096/

University of Strathclyde (Women’s): https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/7108/

UWS: https://www.facebook.com/UWSRugbyClub/

 

Sports Chair: Vacantben@scottishstudentsport.com

Governing Body: Scottish Rugby – https://scottishrugby.org/

Follow us at: #ScotStuRugby

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Rowing before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

Rowing has been used as a mode of transportation as far back as Ancient Egypt. In a sporting sense, there is no direct time linked to its creation but it is believed to have derived in Renaissance England.

The sport of Rowing is fairly simple. The objective is to race across a body of water in a rowing boat moved by oars. The boat that reaches the finish line wins. While the distance of a watercourse can depend on the rules of individual competitions, the common length chosen is 2,000 kilometres.

There are two types of row boats used in major competitions. The first is called a Scull, which allows each rower to have two oars, one on each side of the boat. There are single, double and quadruple scull events. The second is Coxed/Coxless. A Cox (short for Coxwain) will give directions to the rowers to help them steer. That is because, in this event, rowers will only have one oar and will have to communicate to make sure that force is evenly distributed to give the boat a faster speed. Coxless works in the same manner except there isn’t a cox on the boat to guide the rowers.

Each row boat is assigned a lane. Rowers are not permitted to cross over into any other lane or hit an opposing boat with their oars. Doing so can result in a team being disqualified.

Rowing was scheduled to be an event at every Olympic Games since its reemergence in 1896 but the first edition was cancelled due to adverse weather. Great Britain has been successful at the Olympics in rowing, with 31 gold, 25 silver and 14 bronze medals. The most recent gold medals came in 2016 when Team GB won the Men’s Coxless Four, Men’s Coxed Eight and Women’s Coxless Pair.

Each year, Scottish Student Sport host the SSS Regatta, Indoor Championships and Head Race. There are also BUCS Rowing events. To find out more, click here: https://www.scottishstudentsport.com/sports/rowing/

If you’re interested in joining a Rowing club, click the following links:

 

Heriot-Watt University: https://sportsunion.site.hw.ac.uk/boat/

RGU: https://www.rguunion.co.uk/getinvolved/societies/rowing/

University of Aberdeen: https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/6108/

University of Dundee: https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/boat/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/rowing/

University of Glasgow: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/boat/

University of St. Andrews: https://rowing.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Stirling: https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/rowing/

University of Strathclyde: https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/7084/

 

Sports Chair: Matthew Simpson – ScotStuRowing@gmail.com

Governing Body: Scottish Rowing – https://www.scottish-rowing.org.uk/

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Judo before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

Judo Image

Kodokan Judo (more simply known as Judo) is a Japanese martial art which originates from Jujitsu. It was created in 1882 by Dr Jigoro Kano and would become an Olympic sport in 1960 with men first competing in 1964 and women in 1992.

Judo is seen as a sport of honour with specific rules in place for matches. A match will pit two Judoka (Judo fighters) against each other. One fighter dressed in a blue gi with the other donning white. The Judoka will step onto the Tatami mats and bow before the fight begins. A Judo contest will consist of five minutes, with the object of dominating one’s opponents.

There are two main ways to defeat your opponent in Judo. The first is to score an Ippon. An Ippon is awarded if a Judoka can throw their opponent onto their back, can keep their opponent in a grapple hold for more than 20 seconds or get their opponent in an arm hold/chokehold. Scoring an Ippon will immediately end a Judo contest.

The second is to score a Waza-ari. A Waza-ari is awarded to moves that connect with their opponent slightly less than that of an Ippon, such as landing a throw on an opponent without them fully landing on their back and holding a grapple for just shy of 20 seconds. Waza-ari translates to ‘half-point’ which means that scoring two Waza-ari will win the contest.

The final score that can be gained is a Yuko. A Yuko is a move that connects with less force than a Waza-ari. So, a throw with little pace and a grapple for shy of 15 seconds will score a Yuko. You can score any number of Yuko but if your opponent gains at least one Waza-ari, it will outrank any Yuko scored. In some competitions, a scoring system will instead be used, with 100 points awarded for an Ippon, 10 for Waza-ari and 1 for Yuko.

Like most contact sports, Judo matches are split into different weight classes. These are:

  • Extra Lightweight – Men’s ~60kg, Women’s ~48kg
  • Half Lightweight – Men’s 60-66 kg, Women’s 48-52kg
  • Lightweight – Men’s 66-73kg, Women’s 52-57 kg
  • Half Middleweight – Men’s 73-81kg, Women’s 57-63kg
  • Half Heavyweight – Men’s 81-90kg, Women’s 63-70kg
  • Heavyweight – Men’s 90-100kg, Women’s 70-78 kg
  • Open Weight – Men’s +100 kg, Women’s +78kg

Unsurprisingly, Japan has been the most successful nation in the Olympics for Judo competitions. They have received 48 gold medals, exactly three times more than the second most successful nation, France. Great Britain is yet to receive Judo gold but has won eight silver and 11 bronze medals. The most recent of which came in the 2020 Summer Olympics, where Chelsie Giles won a bronze in the Half Lightweight division.

Scottish Student Sport hosts two big Judo events per year. The first is the Kyu Grade Open which is aimed at newcomers to the sport and held to aid in their learning/development. The second is the Individual & Team Championships which is held at the SSS Games which has competitions separated into belt categories, so those at even their 1st kyu can compete for a medal. If you are interested in taking part in a judo club/society, click the links below:

University of Dundee: https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/judo/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/judo/

University of Glasgow: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/judo/

University of St. Andrews: https://judo.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Stirling: https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/8231/

University of Strathclyde: https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/6744/

 

Sports Chair: Paul Grady – scotstujudo@gmail.com

Governing Body – Judo Scotland – https://www.judoscotland.com/

Follow us at: https://www.instagram.com/scotstujudo/

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Golf before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

Golf Image

One of the world’s most beloved sports, Golf has become popular as a calming game which is suitable for all ages. The game is believed to have been invented in 15th Century Scotland, with St. Andrews hosting the world’s oldest Golf course. Since then, the game has become a worldwide phenomenon, being enjoyed by amateurs and professionals alike across the globe.

While there are many variations, the traditional rules of golf see a player attempting to hit their golf ball (known as strokes) into a designated hole. A course will consist of eighteen holes, each of which is played separately with players occupying different holes simultaneously. Each hole will have a Par number. This is the number of strokes a player is allowed without penalty. For example, if a hole is a Par 4 and a player takes five strokes, their score for that hole will be +1 as they took one more stroke than allowed. However, if a player uses fewer strokes, they will get a minus score. In this example, if a player manages to sink the ball into the hole within three strokes, they will get a -1 score. Different scores in golf are allocated different names, such as:

One Shot – Hole in One

-4 – Condor

-3 – Albatross/Double Eagle

-2 – Eagle

-1 – Birdie

0 – Par

+1 – Bogey

+2 – Double Bogey

+3 – Triple Bogey

+4 – Quadruple Bogey

 

The winner is determined by the player with the lowest aggregate score across all holes. There are many terrains that can make up a Golf course. There’s the Green, Rough, Out of Bounds, Bunker and Water. The Green contains short grass and is the most optimal surface to play on. The Rough is, as the name implies, a rougher area of the course with longer grass. The Bunker is a pit of sand which is the most difficult surface to hit the ball out of. If a player hits a Golf ball into water that’s too deep to play out of, they will receive a penalty and will continue play from where they took their initial shot. Out of Bounds is the area beyond the course. If a player hits the ball outside of the course, they will receive a penalty and will continue play from where they took their initial shot, much like hitting a ball into water.

Scottish Student Sport hosts the Scottish Student Golf Championship and the West of Scotland Golf Trophy. This year marks the 99th Scottish Student Golf Championship and will take place in Lossie. These events are available to applicants, with further information found here: https://www.scottishstudentsport.com/sports/golf/

If you are interested in joining a golf club/society, click the links below:

 

Abertay University: https://www.abertay.ac.uk/life/abertay-sport/university-sports-union/golf/

Edinburgh College: https://twitter.com/ecsportsunion?lang=en

Heriot Watt University: https://sportsunion.site.hw.ac.uk/golf/

RGU: https://www.rguunion.co.uk/getinvolved/societies/golf/

UHI: https://www.hisa.uhi.ac.uk/groups/uhi-golf-club

University of Aberdeen: https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/augc/

University of Dundee: https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/golf/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/golf/

University of Glasgow: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/golf/

University of St. Andrews: https://golf.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Stirling: https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/golf/

University of Strathclyde:  https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/6640/

 

Sports Chair: Vacant – chris@scottishstudentsport.com

Governing Body: Scottish Golf – https://www.scottishgolf.org/

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Futsal before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

In recent years, Futsal has become one of the fastest-growing sports in the world. Futsal blends the competitive aspect of Association Football with the skills and flair famously found in Street Football. Originating in South America, Futsal is predominantly played indoors with two teams made up of five players each. There are no limits on the number of substitutions a team is allowed and the game consists of two 20-minute halves. Much like its association counterpart, you must score more goals than your opponent to win a game.

Futsal is a fairly new sport in Scotland with it first being played in 1930s Uruguay with the first FIFA Futsal World Cup being played in 1989. Brazil has won the competition the most out of any country (five times) with Portugal being the current world champion. No team from the United Kingdom has played at a Futsal World Cup and Scotland did not have an official national squad until 2014.

The league system in Scotland is split into different regional leagues with the Super League being the highest tier in Scotland. Eight university teams play in the regional league system. These are:

The University of Aberdeen & Robert Gordon University (SFL Aberdeen)

University of Dundee, St. Andrews Uni 1 & 2 (SFL Dundee)

University of Edinburgh A & B, University of Stirling (SFL Edinburgh)

These universities also play in the Futsal League Cup, the national cup for Scotland. With more attention and funding being put into the sport in Scotland, Futsal is a perfect sport for those that seek competitive action and for those who like Association Football but would prefer to play on a smaller scale.

Every year, Scottish Student Sport run the Futsal Tournament, where student teams from across Scotland are invited to take part. This year, the tournament will take place on February 18th at the University of Stirling. If you wish to take part, or want more information, click the link here:

https://www.scottishstudentsport.com/sports/futsal/

If you wish to take part in Futsal, here is a list of Universities which currently offer clubs/societies:

City of Glasgow College: https://www.citysa.co.uk/get-involved/sports-societies/sport/futsal/

Edinburgh College: https://twitter.com/ecsportsunion?lang=en

Edinburgh Napier University: https://www.napierstudents.com/organisation/sports/futsal/

Heriot-Watt University: https://sportsunion.site.hw.ac.uk/futsal/

Robert Gordon University: https://www.rgu.ac.uk/rgusport/intramural-sport

University of Aberdeen: Contact ausa@abdn.ac.uk

University of Dundee: https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/futsal/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/futsal/

University of St. Andrews: https://futsal.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Stirling: https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/stirfutsal/

University of Strathclyde: https://www.facebook.com/StrathFutsal/

UWS: https://www.facebook.com/TeamUWSFutsal/

 

Sports Chair: Colin Harley – scottishstudentfutsal@gmail.com

Governing Body: Scottish Football Association – https://www.scottishstudentsport.com/sports/futsal/

Follow us at: #ScotStuFutsal

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Football before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

Widely reported as the most popular sport in the world, Football is Scotland’s national sport. The origins of Association Football are unclear as there are many claims to the birth of the sport. As far back as Ancient Greece, the sport Episkyros was played between two teams which the objective of getting a ball into an opponent’s goal. In modern times, the Foot-Ball Club of Edinburgh claims to have played the first games in 1824. The first officially recognized football match was between Sheffield FC and Hallam FC on 26th December 1860. The first recognised international match took place in 1872 between Scotland and England which ended 0-0.

While there are many variations of Football, the most widely offered at colleges and universities is Association Football which consists of two teams of eleven players each. However, many institutions offer 5 A Side and Futsal clubs for those looking for a different way to play the beautiful game.

Scotland’s universities have a rich history in Scottish Football. Both the University of Edinburgh and the University of Glasgow competed in the third-ever Scottish Cup, all the way back in the 1878-79 season. Stirling University first competed in the 2016 Scottish Women’s Cup and made it to the Quarter Finals before losing to eventual finalists Glasgow City.

Currently, the University of Stirling is the highest-ranked university in the Scottish League system. The men’s team compete in the Lowland League, the fifth tier of Scotland, where they claimed their highest league finish of 2nd in the 2013/14 season. In the 2022/23 season, they reached the fourth round of the Scottish Cup, where they were defeated 3-0 by former two-time cup winners Dundee United. University of Stirling’s W.F.C play in the SWPL 2, the second tier of Scotland. They played in the SWPL 1, the highest tier, as recently as 2019 and reached a record-high placement of 4th in the 2015 & 2016 seasons.

There are a number of Scottish Student Sport-affiliated events for those who want to join a football society. There are the SSS Conference Finals, Queen’s Park Shield and College National Finals. University teams also take part in the BUCS Football League, with fixtures played on Wednesdays. To apply to your college/university football club, click the following links:

 

Abertay University: https://www.abertay.ac.uk/life/abertay-sport/university-sports-union/football/

City of Glasgow College: https://www.citysa.co.uk/get-involved/sports-societies/sport/mens-football/

Edinburgh College: https://twitter.com/ecsportsunion?lang=en

Edinburgh Napier (Men’s): https://www.napierstudents.com/organisation/sports/napierfootballmen/

Edinburgh Napier (Women’s): https://www.napierstudents.com/organisation/sports/napierfootballwomen/

Fife College (Men’s): http://www.fc-sa.net/clubs

Fife College (Women’s): http://www.fc-sa.net/clubs

Glasgow Caledonian University (Men’s): https://www.gcustudents.co.uk/groups/football-men-s-1f8e

Glasgow Caledonian University (Women’s): https://www.gcustudents.co.uk/groups/football-women-s-9cf6

Heriot-Watt University: https://sportsunion.site.hw.ac.uk/football/

Queen Margaret University (Men’s): https://www.qmusu.org.uk/groups/football-men-s-9d49

Queen Margaret University (Women’s): https://www.qmusu.org.uk/groups/football-women-s-4c8c

RGU: https://www.rguunion.co.uk/getinvolved/societies/football/

Scotland’s Rural College: https://www.srucsa.org.uk/clubs-societies/

University of Aberdeen (Men’s): https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/aufc/

University of Aberdeen (Women’s): https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/6476/

University of Dundee (Men’s): https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/football-men/

University of Dundee (Women’s): https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/football-women/

University of Edinburgh (Men’s): https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/footballmen/

University of Edinburgh (Women’s): https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/footballwomen/

University of Glasgow (Men’s): https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/footballmen/

University of Glasgow (Women’s): https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/footballwomen/

University of St. Andrews: https://football.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Stirling (Men’s): https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/mensfootball/

University of Stirling (Women’s): https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/womensfootball/

University of Strathclyde (Men’s): https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/6580/

University of Strathclyde (Women’s): https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/6592/

UWS (Ayr): https://www.facebook.com/teamUWSonline/

UWS (Lanarkshire): https://www.facebook.com/teamUWSonline/

UWS (Paisley): https://www.facebook.com/UWS.PaisleyFootball/

 

Sports Chair: Filippo Antoniazzi – f.antoniazzi@rgu.ac.uk

Governing Body: Scottish Football Association – https://www.scottishfa.co.uk/

Follow us at: https://twitter.com/scotstufootball?lang=en

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Cycling before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

When it comes to modes of transportation on land and sea, there will almost certainly be a corresponding sport that uses said modes to race. Cycling is no different. Invented in 1917 by Karl Von Drais, the bicycle has become one of the world’s most popular transportation tools due to its ease of accessibility and relatively cheap cost.

Cycling, as a sport, is very broad as there are several cycling events. In the Olympics, cycling is split into four categories: Road Cycling, Track Cycling, Mountain Biking and BMX. These all work in a similar fashion where two or more cyclists (apart from BMX where it’s taken in turns) will race across a predetermined path where the competitor who finishes with the fastest time is declared the winner. The difference between these events is the terrain they take place on.

Cycling has been an Olympic event during the entirety of its modern resurgence. Great Britain is the most successful nation in Olympic history with 33 gold, 26 silver and 20 bronze medals. At the 2020 Olympics, Great Britain won six gold medals where they won the Women’s Keirin, Men’s Omnium, Women’s Madison, Men’s Cross-Country, Women’s Race and Women’s Freestyle.

Each year Scottish Student Sport hosts the SS Cycling Series where universities compete with each other to be crowned the SS Cycling Challenge. There is also a BUCS League for students to get involved with. If you wish to know more, click the following link: https://www.scottishstudentsport.com/sports/cycling/

If you’re interested in joining a Cycling club, click the following links:

 

Heriot-Watt University: https://sportsunion.site.hw.ac.uk/cycling/

University of Aberdeen: https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/aurcc/

University of Dundee: https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/cycling/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/cycling/

University of Glasgow: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/cycling/

University of Stirling: https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/cycle/

University of Strathclyde: https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/6432/

 

Chair Head: Fred Hockey – SSS_Cycling@hotmail.com

Governing Body: Scottish Cycling – https://www.scottishstudentsport.com/sports/cycling/

Follow us using: #ScotStuCycling

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Cross Country before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

Cross Country is a style of long-distance running. Unique to the sport, Cross Country takes place on natural terrain, usually found within the countryside area. This means that runners may potentially run along roads, grass, mud and wet areas. Cross Country was first introduced in 19th century England and has become a very popular school sport.

The rules of Cross Country are very simple. A group of runners compete against each other to run along a course (typically 4-12km), which can either be one long track or a lapped shorter track. In individual races, the winner is the racer who reaches the finish line first. In team races, the winner is determined by the placement of each team’s individual racer. The team with the highest average placement will be deemed the winner. There is also a more immediately accessible version of Cross Country called the slow race, the goal of which is to finish in last place without stopping.

Cross Country has a peculiar relationship with the Olympics. The sport was contested between 1912-24 but fell into controversy after a heatwave at the 1924 Paris Games where some runners fell unconscious under the heat with two runners falsely being reported as having died. Cross Country does still exist in the Olympics, being a discipline in the Modern Pentathlon event.

The most prestigious Cross Country event is the IAAF Cross Country Championships. In the 2019 edition, all gold medals were won by athletes from either Ethiopia, Kenya or Uganda. The last medal won by Great Britain at the event was the Junior Women’s 6km team event, where they gained bronze.

Cross Country is a very popular sport with many events for potential runners. These include the Winter League, Cross Country Championship, 5km Relay Championship, Half Marathon Championship, 10km Road Race Championship, Hill Running Championship and Inter-District Championships. So, there is plenty of opportunities to get involved.

To learn more, click the following link: Cross Country – Scottish Student Sport

If you’re interested in joining a Cross Country club, click the following links (note, these are mostly Athletics societies, so it is best to contact them about Cross Country before joining):

 

Abertay University: https://www.abertay.ac.uk/life/abertay-sport/university-sports-union/athletics/

City of Glasgow College: https://www.citysa.co.uk/get-involved/sports-societies/sport/running/

Edinburgh College: https://ecsa.scot/activities

Edinburgh Napier University: https://www.napierstudents.com/organisation/sports/napierathletics/

Glasgow Caledonian University: https://www.gcustudents.co.uk/groups/athletics–8

Heriot-Watt University: https://sportsunion.site.hw.ac.uk/athletics/

RGU: https://www.rguunion.co.uk/getinvolved/societies/athletics/

University of Aberdeen: https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/auac/

University of Dundee: https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/athletics/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/athletics/

University of Glasgow: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/athletics/

University of St. Andrews: https://athletics.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Stirling: https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/athletics/

University of Strathclyde: https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/6408/

 

Sports Chair: Gregor Malcolm – scotstucrosscountry@outlook.com

Governing Body: Scottish Athletics – https://www.scottishathletics.org.uk/

Follow us at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ScottishStudentAthletics

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Wednesday 1st February 2023

Want to know more about Boxing before joining a society? Here’s a quick overview of the sport and what SSS has to offer.

Boxing Image

Boxing is one of the world’s most historic sports. The earliest evidence of Ancient Boxing comes from the Middle East in 3,000 BC and was made an Olympic sport at the 23rd Olympiad in 688 BC.  Boxing, as we know it today, is largely derived from the Marquees of Queensbury rules, first published in 1867.

Boxing is a 1v1 sport which consists of three rounds, typically ranging between 3-12 per fight. The objective of the game is to render your opponent unconscious or unable to answer a referee’s 10 count once they’ve fallen to the floor. If neither has happened before the allocated number of rounds is over, the result will be decided by a judge’s score. A judge will base their decision on who they felt had the best performance per round. Once the scores are added together, the fighter with the most points will be declared the winner. If scores are still equal, the bout will be ruled a draw.

While bare-knuckle fighting does exist, almost all professional boxing is contested using boxing gloves. At some levels, fighters will also wear headgear to protect themselves from potential head injuries/concussions. You are not allowed to hit an opponent below the belt, on the back of their head or the back of their neck.

Boxing is performed in a ring with ropes and four corner stations. Fighters are not permitted to use ropes as leverage and are not allowed to leave the ring for the duration of a fight. Fighters will be warned of rule breaks and may face a points deduction or disqualification if rules are continuously breached.

Boxing matches are separated by weight class. In amateur boxing, these are:

Light Flyweight – Men’s 46-49kg, Women’s 45-48kg

Flyweight – Men’s 49-52kg, Women’s 48-51kg

Bantamweight – Men’s 52-56kg, Women’s 51-54kg

Featherweight –Women’s 54-57kg

Lightweight – Men’s 56-60kg, Women’s 57-60kg

Light Welterweight – Men’s 60-64kg, Women’s 60-64kg

Welterweight – Men’s 64-69kg, Women’s 64-69kg

Middleweight – Men’s 69-75kg, Women’s 69-75 kg

Light Heavyweight – Men’s 75-81kg, Women’s 75-81kg

Heavyweight – Men’s 81-91kg

Great Britain has seen large success at the Olympic Games where they are the third most successful Boxing nation, with twenty gold medals and sixty-two medals overall. In 2022, Great Britain won two gold medals. Galal Yafai won gold in the Men’s Flyweight while Lauren Price won the Women’s Middleweight gold.

Scottish Student Sport hosts many boxing events throughout the year, including the Annual Scottish Student Championships, BUCS Championships and British and Irish Championships. So, there are plenty of events for budding boxers to compete in

If you are interested in joining a boxing society, click the following links:

 

Heriot-Watt University: https://sportsunion.site.hw.ac.uk/boxing/

RGU: https://www.rguunion.co.uk/getinvolved/societies/boxing/

University of Aberdeen: https://www.ausa.org.uk/sports/club/aubxc/

University of Dundee: https://sportsunion.dundee.ac.uk/clubs/boxing/

University of Edinburgh: https://www.eusu.ed.ac.uk/organisation/boxing/

University of Glasgow: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/sport/whatson/club/boxing/

University of St. Andrews: https://boxing.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/

University of Stirling: https://www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/sportsunion/clubs/boxing/

University of Strathclyde: https://www.strathunion.com/sports-union/club-sport/club/6240/

 

Sports Chair: Hameed Ahmed – sssboxingchair@gmail.com

Governing Body: Boxing Scotland – https://www.boxingscotland.org/

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